Russia Can Remain a Great Power in the 21st Century -- If It Adds Ukraine

The way to do that is to co-opt its elites, nothing else will work

I suppose that if superintelligence is developed soon, or the entire world melts together into a post-historical open borders dystopia/utopia, or some existential risk does as all in, then these considerations will become rather irrelevant.

However, if the 21st century continues on a more or less “business as usual” path, then having 200 million people (most of Ukraine + Belorussia + South Siberia) will be preferable to having 150 million due to the greater economies of scale and innovation that having more people enables.

Now to be sure, Russia can survive without the Ukraine as a declining Medium Power.

Even so, “population is power“, as a powerful commenter keeps reminding uson this very blog.

And all that is apart from the basic principle of reuniting a separated people, promoted by all Russian nationalists from Ilyin to Solzhenitsyn, and repairing the standing insult to the aesthetics of the world map represented by fake and gay countries such as Belarus and the Ukraine.

This post will discuss how to go about it.

“Winning hearts and minds,” apart from being a cuck move, is unfeasible anyway; even going so far as giving back Crimea will not restore goodwill and invite only well-deserved contempt.

Going back to giving gibsmedats (e.g. gas subsidies) would also be idiotic. Even the kremlins have realized this that you don’t buy loyalty or friendship with that, though they have yet to extend that lesson to the rest of the Sovietstans.

Russia invested $200 billion into the Ukrainian economy over 20 years, the US – $5 million into the “development of democracy.” It seems we didn’t invest correctly. An important lesson. – Alexey Pushkov, United Russia MP.

Reunification through Eurasian integration was permanently ruled out in February 2014, when a false flag-abetted coup unseated the bandit President Yanukovych and brought Maidanists to power.

Reunification through military means was ruled out – probably permanently – in May 2014, when Putin recognized Poroshenko as the legitimately elected President of the Ukraine. While certain nationalists, including on this blog, still entertain fantasies about invading the Ukraine and ruling it like a Reichskommissariat, that would be worse than just immoral – it would almost certainly fail, since it buys into the narrative that Ukrainians can only become Russians at the point of a gun. “There is no compulsion in religion”, as the Muslims say.

Finally, given the collapse in “Russophile” attitudes in the Ukraine after 2014, there is no scope today either for “deals” with new “partners” like Tymoshenko. Which even on the off chance that they happen will only degenerate into the usual post-sovok traditions of stealing money from some project, which always, and not undeservedly, only feeds foreign disdain for Russia.

At the same time, Russia has no obligation to tolerate the existence of a hostile anti-Russian project on its borders that furthermore has the gall to parasite on Russian history and culture on account of possessing so little of its own (see the svidomy beliefs that the Ukraine is the “true Rus” and so forth).

Consequently, the best move now would be to sabotage the svidomy entity at every possible turn.

Here are my proposals on how to do that.

First, the LDNR needs to be recognized, consolidated, and admitted into Russia as a Donbass Republic.

This will invite more Western sanctions, but that has acquired runaway dynamicsanyway; meanwhile, the LDNR’s existence in their current, semi-bandit form are a sort of permanent black PR on Russia’s image that repels not just Ukrainians but all normal people – a sad fact that pretty much all Russian nationalists acknowledge.

Moreover, I suspect even Russian leftist backers of Novorossiya would agree. After the assassination of Zakharchenko, power has in the DNR has passed back to the Yanukovych clan, which will soon be formalized by the rigged election of a literal fraudster to the Presidency. Meanwhile, prominent Russian leftist writer and Novorossiya supporter Zakhar Prilepin has had his battalion disbanded. This is assuredly not what people such as National Bolsheviks who went to the Donbass fought for.

Finally, there is also the principle that Russia’s most loyal supporters – people who themselves identify as Russian – should not have to suffer indefinitely in legal limbo for their choices.

Second, the Ukraine needs to be strip mined of its human capital.

For inspiration, I would look to China’s “31 Steps for Taiwan” program:

On Feb. 28, it unveiled a package of 31 “incentives” to attract Taiwanese people and businesses to the mainland, offering tax breaks and subsidies for high-tech companies, research grants for academics, and a promise to allow Taiwanese companies to bid for government infrastructure projects and even become involved in China’s “One Belt, One Road” global development plan.

China called the measures an expression of its belief that there is “one family” on both sides of the Taiwan Strait. Taiwanese Vice Premier Shih Jun-ji cast it as an effort to undermine the island’s economy.

“China’s attempt to attract Taiwan’s capital and talent, especially high tech and young students, has clear political intentions,” he said at a news conference, unveiling eight counter­measures designed to keep people at home.

In 2012, Oxford Economics judged that Taiwan faced the largest “talent deficit” among 46 countries surveyed, and the research firm recently said that the conclusion stands today.

Taiwan’s performance on the Nature Index, a proxy for elite scientific output, has collapsed by 40% in the past five years – the largest collapse of any country. A testament to the success of the 31 Steps.

Meanwhile, the development of a separate Taiwanese identity, which had previously grown rapidly, has basically stalled in this same period.

Now in one sense, this will be harder, since China is much bigger than Taiwan, and Ukraine also has an association agreement with the EU. But in another sense, it will also be easier, because Russian wages are 3x higher than Ukrainian ones, whereas it’s the opposite ratio between China and Taiwan.

For instance, Russian researcher salaries in the past 5 years have exploded – though from a very low base – and rose by 70% this year alone. They are now well north of $1,000, which is now probably an order of magnitude higher than in the Ukraine.

One positive result is that the criticisms I voiced in my large post decrying the state of Russian science have become less actual in the past few months alone, even if there is still a huge amount of lost ground to make up.

No doubt this happened because PUTLER personally reads my blog, as my multiple extremely high placed sources tell me all the time.

Anyhow, forget about Ukraine being 30% cheaper (or whatever) than Russia. With such a gap, Russia can easily attract most of Ukraine’s remaining elite researchers wholesale, no matter how svidomy they are.

Svidomism wins out over repression, but money wins out over svidomism.

Russia needs to come up with a program along the lines of China’s “31 Measures for Taiwan,” involving a complex package of subsidies, marketing, and immigration deregulation to strip mine the separatist entity of its human capital.

By strip mining the Ukraine of human capital, I mean something more sophisticated than just open borders and handing out Russian passports like candy (though that should certainly also be done, even if Poland will necessarily do better for now on account of its higher wages).

I mean selectively targeting Ukraine’s remaining cognitive elites and O-Ring sectors for transplantation into Russia wholesale, which is specifically what China is doing to Taiwan – successfully, despite their triple wage differential (my post on how the small, complex O-Ring sector determines wages for the economy as a whole). Nobody is currently doing that to the Ukraine that I know of. Sure, Ukrainian professors can still emigrate to Canada or whatever, but that requires a lot of work on their part; I just propose not just clearing away the red tape, but actively cajoling them along. The list of precisely which people, institutions, and corporations should be targeted requires serious analytical work. I am willing to offer my consulting services on this question at the ULTRA LOW rate of $500 per hour.

This would be perfectly congruent with the Russian nationalist position that the Ukraine is an extension of Russia. Admittedly, it’s not so congruent with the sovok view that treats the UkSSR as a legitimate entity with legitimate borders, a view that is still entrenched in the Russian bureaucracy that occasionally even tries to send Ukrainians who fought in the Novorossiya Armed Forces back into the loving embrace of the SBU. This has prevented and will likely continue to prevent Russia from adopting these Chinese best practices, at least until sovok ways of thinking become fully discredited and the Lenin statues start to come down.

However, on the off chance that PUTLER continues heeding my advice, here’s what will happen when “31 Steps for the Ukraine” are implemented:

1. Russia will at the very least benefit from a modest expansion of its smart fraction, which will be ethnically non-hostile (something you can’t say of all Brahmins) and will come at close to zero cost – while also weakening a hostile state.

2. The immigrating Ukrainians will also benefit (otherwise, why would they go?).

3. To be sure, the Russians who insist on larping as Ukrainians in the Ukraine will not be so well off. But such is the cost of their “European choice.”

But there will be no more wars, either real ones (ruled out by Ukrainian military improvements since 2014) or gas wars (you pay for the gas or you don’t get the gas, simple as – for everything else there is Nord Stream 2 and China).

4. Over time, there will be a reflux effect as these elite Ukrainians form a moneyed, high IQ pro-Russian constituency.

5. Obviously it would be best if the EU continues disintegrating and/or destroying itself with Infinity Refugees to help make the choices on offer in the Ukraine clearer.

There is no particular need to cause needless antagonism by repressing Ukrainian svidomism. Instead, it would seem logical to partly adopt Ukrainian svidomism and weaponize it for Russian national purposes.

I have already suggested the EXTREMELY POWERFUL idea of staging gladitorial combat between sovoks and svidomy to decide the fate of individual Lenin statues. Sovoks win – they stay. Svidomy win – they get to pull it down. Rinse and repeat for every town and city. Make it a weekly, televised event. It will let the svidomy have a sort of voice and investment into Russia’s direction, blow off necessary steam, and inject some Bronze Age vitalism into the body politic.

The anti-Bandera cult will need to be dismantled, but it seems pretty useless and played out anyway, like most sovok things. Indeed, why stop at just painting Bandera as a renegade Russian? That’s for the weak. An EVEN MORE POWERFUL idea would be to reinvent Bandera as a Russian hero, fighting against the Communist, Jewish, and Polish oppressors.

By that time, Russia will be responsible for the Holocaust anyway, so it will have nothing to lose anyway.

Bonus: Ukrainian nationalist songs are pretty groovy.

At the end of the day, it is not ordinary people – proles – who set national policies. It is national elites. While the Ukraine was roughly evenly divided between Russia and the West from 1991-2014, its elites were consistently Atlanticist in orientation, and dragged the rest of the country along; no matter how generously Russia subsidized its proles. Russia needs to co-opt the Ukraine’s national elites in the same way that the West did after 1991. And I don’t mean through crony deals with their post-sovok rulers – the only approach that Russian sovoks understand. I mean making Russian culture so majestic and attractive that they not only wish to submit, but actually pay for the privilege.

Once that happens, the Ukrainian masses will follow in the footsteps of Viktor Marchenko, the anti-hero of Deus Ex: Mankind Divided:

Born: 1991 near Zaporizhia, Ukraine
Left school after 10 years (2 years shy of the compulsory 12) to become a shift worker on a drilling gang looking for shale-gas deposits in eastern Ukraine.
Ran into trouble in 2011 when a group of Pro-Russian separatists started a fight with his crew in Mariupol after work; he tried to break it up, got injured, and ended up in hospital. Could have been when he got augmented-not sure. (Records get pretty scarce here. In fact, there’s a good 12 year period we can’t account for, and no record of when or where he DID get augmented.)
Shows up again briefly in 2023, this time with a wife and newborn kid: Alisa Maratovna and Raisa Viktorichna. Only now he’s in Belgorod.
Which I don’t get, frankly.
A pro-Ukrainian national moving to Russia only makes sense if he stayed with energy companies all those years. Everyone wanted a piece of their reserves after 2015. But that would have put him somewhere in Siberia, not Belgorod. Belgorod is on the border with Ukraine. It’s got nothing to do with oil. It does, however, have a long history of military occupation-and in 2016, it was the city from which the newly-minted Russian Federated States deployed Belltower Associates to quell Ukraine’s anti-separatist dissension once and for all.

After all, the US even dropped a couple of nukes on Japan, but soon afterwards, the Japanese came to love the Americans. While some claim that questions of cultural influence are very hard, in reality they are extremely simple: People love winners, and despise losers. The Russian Empire were winners, so much so that there were strong Russophile movements in Galicia, and in far-off Bohemia (Masaryk wanted to introduce Russian language instructions in Czech schools – understandably vetoed by the Austrian authorities). The sovoks were losers – so much so that by the 1990s, even many Russians wanted to have nothing to do with Russia.

It’s time to become winners again through SWPL supremacism, CRISPR-transhumanism, and neoliberal domestic economics.

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