Finland Is Officially the Happiest Country on Earth, Is it Because it Has No Immigrants?

This small country on Russia's northern border, which was part of the Russian empire from 1809 to 1917, is a great place to visit, an easy hop from St. Petersburg

  • " ... what the data seems to support is the idea that, if anything, the more multicultural a country becomes, the less happy they are, so that diversity is, in fact, our misery rather than our strength."

OK, to be honest, visiting this capital was never on my bucket list, but it was part of a Baltic cruise I went on recently, and I’m glad it was.  To my surprise, Helsinki is worth a day trip at least, offering up a blend of cool Nordic design and neoclassical architecture set against a baby-blue sky dotted with scudding wisps of cirrus clouds. 

But besides being a nice place to visit, it’s an even better place to live, at least according to the latest survey from the World Happiness Index (yes, that’s a thing), which indicates that Finland is the happiest country on earth.

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At first blush, I thought “no wonder”, as I strolled through the harbor-front marketplace toward Senate Square and down the tree-lined Esplanade of the shopping district toward the iconic art nouveau train station.  The city looked prosperous, the people really did look happy and healthy, and it was a glorious and bright summer day!  What’s not to like, especially with the flowers in bloom? Well, here’s the other side of the coin:

  • Those nice summer days are rare indeed up here.  Helsinki is the northernmost European capital, and the winters are bitterly cold.  Such foreboding weather usually means dour dispositions, not smiling faces.  

  • Finland has had its share of war and strife.  It was subject to Stalin’s brutal Winter War, then had to stand up against the great Russian bear throughout the decades-long Cold War.

  • They really have no natural resources to speak of, unlike their more fortunate Nordic neighbor Norway, nor are they lucky enough to have a superb major seaport like Sweden.  

So, the weather ain’t so great, the land doesn’t “front” them anything, and history hasn’t been particularly kind to them, either.  Why, then ,are these the happiest people on earth?  To my way of thinking, the answer lies (partly, at least) in the question itself.  Let me explain:

  • They are happy because, in spite of the fact that they don’t have mineral riches, they do have an enormous reservoir of intellectual and creative capital to draw from: their own people.  Finnish leadership in the fields of architecture, electronics, music, and such diverse and creative industries as glassware, jewelry, fashion design, and even custom fishing lures has made them relatively rich even by European standards, and while money may not buy you love, it’s hard to be ecstatic if you can’t pay your bills.  There’s a reason why some of the poorest countries on earth are among the least happy,   after all…Africa is basically a miserable continent, at least according to the latest survey, so  it’s no wonder they are all voting with their feet and leaving the Dark Continent as fast as they can.

  • But there’s money handed to you, and there’s money earned.  Saudi Arabians get money handed to them.  Lots of it.  Yet they aren’t very happy.  Finns earn their keep, and they’ve got to be proud of that.  When your tiny nation (by population, not land mass) produces such names as Sibelius, Saarinen, and Aalto, and is home to great products and companies such as Nokia, Viking Line, and Fiskars, among many others, its a source of national pride.  Again, though, we’re back to the quality of the people.

  • Also a source of happiness and pride are Finland’s great social services, which include the best universal health care in Europe and the most innovative and successful schoolsYet what makes these great services possible?  PeopleGreat schools aren’t possible without the concerned and dedicated parents of high-IQ children.  Universal health care works best when citizens are responsible enough to live healthy lifestyles. It doesn’t work so well when the patients weigh 400+ pounds and/or eat opioids like candy.

  • Low crime.  Yes, Finland has the lowest crime rates on earth.  Wow, it makes you happy when you feel safe!  Who knew?  :))  But yes-people choose a life of crime…or not.  In Finland, they choose to obey the law.

  • Population density-Finland has the lowest density in Europe.  There’s nothing wrong with city life, I suppose, so long as you can get away from it when you want to.  Helsinki is a great city, but there’s lots of beautiful nature to enjoy right outside.  That’s one reason why Canada is also a very happy place, I’d wager, while India?  Not so much.

So - Finland has great people, and great people make for happy nations.  Dig a little deeper, and you’ll find that Finland is one of the most ethnically homogenous countries in Europe.  96.5% are native-born Finns, and of the remaining 3.5%, most are from Russia, Estonia, and Sweden-not exactly a multi-cultural paradise.  That’s right, they don’t call it the Great White North for nothin’….hell, they don’t even let many Swedes across the border!  

Speaking of Sweden, all of the other Nordic countries score high as well (see page 23), taking 4 of the top 5 spots.  It’s no surprise to me that they are composed almost entirely of the native-born, because, contrary to the (((narrative))), there is no evidence whatsoever that diversity is, in fact, anyone’s “strength”, at least not when it comes to this most important metric.  Au contraire.  I’ve yet to see a single smidgeon of proof to buttress the absurd claim made by that slogan.

No, what the data seems to support is the idea that, if anything, the more multicultural a country becomes, the less happy they are, so that diversity is, in fact, our misery rather than our strength.  Thus, even countries like Russia, which Rachel Madcow tells me is run by Lucifer and is just one big gas station economically, is quite a bit happier today than they were in 2012 (see page 31) in spite of the fact that they are hardly a favorite destination for aspiring Nigerian rapists or Tunisian jihadists.  

On the other hand, Italy, which has been the beneficiary of a veritable flotilla of “migrants”, has fallen precipitously in the rankings, from 28th in 2012 to 47th now. I guess those Tuscan rubes didn’t get the memo from on high that they were supposed to be happy with an invading horde of military-age men bent on establishing sharia law and knowing their women. Even the USA, which absorbed Mexico’s entire GDPP (gross domestic product of peons), has fallen from 11th to 18th place in just 6 years. 

How can this be?  If, as we are constantly told, we natives are being culturally enriched all the time by this wonderful mass of humanity, shouldn’t we be just about jumping up and down for joy by now?  Why are we so unhappy with the outcomes, especially when (we’re told), those immigrants are model citizens who represent our future?  

Could it be because we aren’t stupid enough to believe a bald-faced lie when we hear it? Could it be that we believe our own eyes more than the inanities and distortions of the (((media))? Could it be that we actually liked the way our countries were before they turned into a giant social experiment? Could it be that, like me, they would love to live in a country like Finland that didn’t suffer from the racial and religious strife that an unrepentant and militant mass of illegal aliens brings with them?

After all, if Finland has the safest streets, top-shelf health care, the best schools, a legacy of innovation and creativity, and the happiest people on earth … why change that?  Will crime go down if they import pederasts who justify rape so long as it’s a sexual emergency?  Are morbidly obese, chain smoking patients the best use of hospital emergency rooms?  

Do unskilled, low IQ vagrants add to the national treasure?  In short, would multiculturalism do anything to improve the lives of ordinary Finns?  If the answer is no, I don’t see why it’s even topic of serious discussion; but then, I’m not a “globalist” with a hidden agenda.

There’s an old saying that is as true today as the first time I heard it: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Well, Finland ain’t broke, but the pompous bastards in Brussels say that Finland (and the rest of the EU) is too white.  I am still waiting for a politician bold enough to say that Africa is too black, China too Asian, or Israel too Jewish.  

Speaking of which, Jews are always at the forefront of these movements, and Barbara Spectre, who is as ghoulish and unpleasant as her name implies, is busy trying to import as many burkha-wrapped Muslims into Sweden as she can, begging the question: if multiculturalism is everywhere and in all places an unmitigated good, why isn’t she peddling that line in Tel Aviv?  I suspect she wouldn’t get much of an audience in a country that forcibly sterilized the unfortunate black women who foolishly thought that Israel was a civilized nation when they tried to immigrate there.

I will make an easy prediction: if Finland follows the advice of its masters in the EU plutocracy, it will be less happy in the future, and that trajectory will be directly correlated to the degree that they are “culturally enriched” at the behest of their betters, who live in secluded and guard-gated enclaves far from the madding crowds of terrorists and rape gangs that the hoi-polloi must endure in the name of multiculturalism, inclusiveness and diversity. 

These are the buzzwords of a twisted and degenerate conspiracy bent on the utter destruction of an entire culture.  Finland would do well to heed the modern interpretation of Virgil’s warning to the Trojans: Beware of “rescue” ships bearing gifts, for they are filled with invaders, and their objective is the same as that of the quislings in Brussels and beyond: the destruction of Christendom, and the implementation of a New World Order ruled by a rather different sort of king. 

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