Real Justice for Syria Gas Attack: Moscow Submits Evidence, New Resolution to UN Security Council

Russia submits data and a resolution calling for an impartial investigation — exactly what the US doesn't want

Thu, Apr 6, 2017 | 9771 Comments
Vladimir Safronkov
Vladimir Safronkov

Russia has submitted a draft resolution to the UN Security Council calling for "a true investigation" into the alleged use of chemical weapons in the Syrian town of Khan Shaykhun on Tuesday. 

And that's not all: Russia has submitted data and evidence that will undermine Washington's "slam dunk" case against Assad. 

At the emergency meeting convened by the UN Security Council earlier on Wednesday, Russia criticized the resolution drafted by the US, UK and France as "evidently drawn up in a hurry and extremely negligently".

Fedor Strzhizhovsky, press secretary of Russia’s permanent representative to the UN, confirmed that Russia has now "submitted our short draft resolution, drawn up in a business manner and aimed at conducting a true investigation rather than to appoint the guilty ones until the facts are established."

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During the emergency Security Council meeting on Wednesday, Russia's deputy United Nations ambassador Vladimir Safronkov said that the West's "obsession with regime change is what hinders this Security Council."

Russia's UN representative criticized the resolution proposed by the US and its partners as a provocation based on "falsified reports from the White Helmets", an organization that has been "discredited long ago".

 

Safronkov then asked the US, UK and France: "Did this event take place? Have you even checked what you wrote?"

 

On Wednesday, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that Russia would submit data from the Russian Defense Ministry about the alleged gas attack. 

According to Peskov, "Russia will at least cite in a well-argued manner those data that were mentioned by our Defense Ministry during the work in the UN Security Council".
 

 

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