Putin: Russia Will Counter US Missile Shields With More Powerful Missiles

If the US insists on encircling Russia with missile shields, Russia will simply develop more powerful missiles

Wed, Jun 14, 2017 | 3399 Comments
Just a friendly Iskander
Just a friendly Iskander

Good morning! Today is June 14, 2017. And as usual, there is lots of devious Russian Meddling in the news. 

Today's top story: Why did Russia put its country so close to America's missile shields? And why does Putin insist upon maintaining "strategic balance"? 

"Practically the entire territory of Russia will be surrounded by these systems," Putin said. "In fact, this is another great strategic mistake by our partners. Because Russia will give an adequate response to all these actions."

"At the same time, our response will be a lot cheaper," he said.

Putin said Russia was forced to develop its missile strike capabilities to maintain the strategic balance of forces after the US withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in 2002. 

"We proposed to jointly engage in a missile shield project of the United States, Russia and Europe," Putin said. "Regretfully, our partners eventually rejected this proposal."

"But in order to keep this important element of international stability, namely to keep the strategic balance of forces, we will be forced to develop our missile strike capabilities and missile systems capable of penetrating any missile shield," the Russian leader said.

advertisement
In his much-anticipated Showtime interview, Putin also politely pointed out that US missile facilities in the Mediterranean, Eastern Europe and other regions can be transformed into strike facilities "in minutes, maybe in a few hours."

Curious minds want to know: How do US missile shields increase European security? 

Let's move on. More headlines:

  • "All of America’s allies and partners have been calling on Washington to improve its relations with Russia, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson acknowledged after the US Senate reached a bipartisan deal to boost sanctions against Moscow." [RT]
     
  • This one is fun: Karlin has a great write-up of Navalny's doomed Tverskaya jamboree. As one of the participants of the scheduled festivities tells it, the Navalny people were not very cordial: "They [the liberals] yelled into the faces of myself, the musicians and historical reconstructionists that we were 'traitors', that what we’re doing is useless sh*t, that we should instead be having meetings, that we are paid-off varmints who were placed there in order to disrupt their meetings. To our protests that we’re teaching people crafts and history, we received the reply: 'Nobody needs any of that sh*t! We need to have meetings and create a revolution!'" [Karlin]
     
  • A lot of Russians have questions for Putin: "Two days before Russian President Vladimir Putin’s annual televised question and answer session, more than 1.3 million Russians have submitted their questions, Rossiya 24 broadcaster said on Tuesday". [TASS]
     
  • The US attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has rejected allegations that he took part in collusion with Moscow to influence the 2016 election as an “appalling and detestable lie”. [The Guardian]

advertisement