Glamorous, Old-Fashioned Balls are a Fad Among Russian Christians

The movement to revive 19th century-style balls in Russia is gathering force. They’re uptight, they're proper, they’re strict. And guess what? The youth loves them

Sun, Oct 15, 2017
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This article originally appeared onRussian Faith, a new website with news about the Christian renaissance in Russia. See their introductory video at end of article.


A hundred years later, glamorous formal balls are making a major comeback in Russia. 

And they are doing so with the blessing and support of the Russian Christian Church.

In fact, most balls are organized by Russian Christian volunteer groups. Balls are held during the major Christian holidays, such as Easter, Christmas and the Meeting of the Lord in the big cities of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. The only time they're not allowed to happen is during any Lent periods. 

The revenue from the balls goes to charities, most commonly orphanages. Months of intense preparation precede the event. Youth meets for dance training, rehearsing the polka, waltz, mazurka, etc.

No one wants to stumble around, glaringly unprepared, in the ballroom.

Of course, meanwhile, they are making friends.

The ball itself begins with a short church service led by the supervising priest. It proceeds according to a tight schedule, which includes dances and a few short music performances. The balls almost always feature live music.

All in all, they're pretty structured, formal affairs which retain all the traditional rituals of the genre: men in frocks ask women in long dresses to dance. The dances are precise, rehearsed, and elegant, with no pretense at the wild abandon of night clubs.

Yet despite the modern conception of fun as necessarily unstructured and informal, the excitement at these events is exhilarating.


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