Every Year, 40,000 Russians Walk 92 Miles to Honor Saint (VIDEO)

RT met some of the Orthodox pilgrims to understand what motivates them to take part in this challenging and demanding pilgrimage. It's absolutely astounding to hear them explain

Wed, Nov 1, 2017
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This article originally appeared on a new site about the Christian renaissance in Russia, called Russian Faith. Their introductory video is at end of this article.


This phenomenal documentary by Russian Times takes you on the oldest, longest and by far the biggest cross procession in Russia.

Cross processions are a vivid, important part of Russian Christianity. (Read more about them in our recent article here)

One of the most famous ones is a 92-mile walk to the place where, in 1382, the Velikoretsky miracle-working icon of St. Nicholas was found.

Every year,  in Russia, 40,000 pilgrims from all over country walk 160 kilometers (92 miles) for 5 days following the icon of St. Nicholas the Wonderworker.

Though the icon itself disappeared during the 1930s and the Soviet Regime outlawed cross processions, pilgrims continued coming. Despite the danger of being harassed, arrested and some even executed, unofficially, the tradition continued throughout the entire Soviet period. In 1990, it was officially reinstated.

Today, the procession mobilizes up to 60,000 people and lasts a week. Nights are spent in the fields.

This past summer, RT met some of the Orthodox pilgrims to understand what motivates them to take part in this challenging and demanding pilgrimage.

It's absolutely astounding to hear these people explain.


A video introducing Russian Faith:

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