Did Turkish Secret Service Kill a Powerful Russian Spy Chief?

Of course not. But does it matter? Usual no-proof-news trying to make Russia look bad, weak and vulnerable

Wed, Mar 9, 2016 | 12,218 Comments
Igor Sergun, Former Director of GRU, the Main Intelligence Directorate of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation

The death of the powerful GRU (Russian military intelligence service) commander Igor Sergun is back in the news courtesy of The Jerusalem Post citing a Lebanese report. As if we haven’t had enough of wild conspiracy theories peddled by Stratfor and Financial Times, it’s now time to listen to the trusty "unnamed London-based diplomat". How convenient!

The anonymous source starts off his rant with:

[I cannot] “rule out that his death could have been the result of a complicated intelligence security operation in which several Arab and Middle Eastern intelligence actors may have participated. Moscow must have discovered some clues to this matter.”

In other words no sooner than he opens his mouth it becomes a guessing game: “Could”, “May”, “Must have”.

Evidence that Sergun was murdered? None whatsoever is offered. That doesn’t stop preclude even more dubious claims. The believability is pushed to the limit in saying that Sergun's death is the cause of the tensions between Turkey and Russia, implicating specifically the MIT (Turkey Secret Service) as having carried out the hit on the former GRU commander

“It is this that made Russia’s decision for confrontation with Turkey decisive and final.”

Like for MH17, Chemical attacks in Syria, Iraq’s WMD and many other issues that have shaped the course of the world in the last years, no evidence is provided to sustain the accusations against Russia or its allies. Anonymous sources are compared to hard rock-solid evidence, opinions become best-practice and hopes and wishes are used to fuel american exceptionalism and White house foreign policy strategies.

It does not matter what really happened, it’s just important to blame it on Putin no matter how anonymous, wild or ridicules the accusations look.

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